Historian Alan G. Gauthreaux chronicles 12 homicide cases from late 1800s and early 1900s Louisiana--where "unwritten law" justified jilted women who killed their paramours, and police took measures to protect defendants from lynch mobs. Stories include the 1907 kidnapping of seven-year-old Walter Lamana by the New Orleans "Black Hand," the 1912 acquittal of Zea McRee (a woman of "good reputation") in Opelousas, and the 1934 trial and execution of Shreveport's infamous "Butterfly Man."

Bloodstained Louisiana: Twelve Murder Cases, 1896-1934

$21.00Price
  • ISBN: 1476672164
    6 x 9 Paperback
    202 Pages
    Published: November 07, 2017
    Features: Illustrated, Bibliography, Index

  • Mr. Gauthreaux was born and raised in the New Orleans area and served as a deputy with the Orleans Parish Criminal Sheriff's Office. Mr. Gauthreaux is a graduate of the University of New Orleans with bachelor's and master's degrees in History (with honors). Prior to becoming a teacher, Mr. Gauthreaux worked as a legal investigator for some of the most prestigious law firms in New Orleans and Metairie, Louisiana. He has taught in middle school, high school, and college, and even worked as the National Outreach Coordinator for the National World War II Museum in New Orleans, drawing praise for his inventive educational programming and lively speaking engagements.